People

Ed Knippers

Ed Knippers, an artist who is Southern in heritage and Christian in religion, was educated at Asbury College and the University of Tennessee. His work is influenced by the German Expressionist and Baroque traditions, among others, and depicts biblical narratives with, sometimes, grotesque images. In addition to narrating stories visually, he also works to contradict the human impulse to separate the spirit from the flesh by making the body central to his paintings.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 100

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 100: Jennifer Burns, on the life and legacy of Ayn Rand, "goddess of the market" and entrenched enemy of altruism; Christian Smith, on the aimless cultural world of "emerging adulthood" and on how it makes the idea of objective moral order implausible; and Dallas Willard, on why it's important to recover the conviction that religious beliefs involve real knowledge. In honor of the five score milestone, part two of the issue features a look back at the beginnings of the Journal and a few special excerpts of conversations with those early guests, including Peter Kreeft on Lewis, Huxley, and J.F.K. after death; P. D. James, on good and evil in fiction; James Davison Hunter, on culture wars; Paul McHugh, on when psychiatry loses its way; Ted Prescott, on nudity in art and advertising; Ed Knippers, on the powerful presence of the body; Martha Bayles, on pop and perverse modernism; Dominic Aquila, on Christopher Lasch; Gilbert Meilaender, on random kindness; Neil Postman, on technology and culture; and Alan Jacobs, on being maudlin in Madison County.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 9

Guests on Volume 9: William Bennett, on the power of stories in the cultivation of virtue; Mark Juergensmeyer, on religious nationalism and the possibilities of new cold wars; Ed Knippers, on the spiritual reasons for the vivid physicality of his paintings of Biblical narratives; Joshua Gamson, on Claims to Fame: Celebrity in Contemporary America; Ken Myers, on "attitude" and violence in pop culture and on the streets; Richard Doerflinger, on the ethical numbness of the NIH Embryo Research Panel; Richard John Neuhaus, on assisted suicide and the chilling prospects of modern eugenics; and Ted Libbey, on making an initial approach to classical music.