People

Makoto Fujimura

Internationally renown painter Makoto Fujimura is the founder of the International Arts Movement (iamny.org). He received his M. F. A. from Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music and his B. A. from Bucknell University. He is the youngest artist who has had his work featured in the Museum of Contemporary Art in Tokyo, and has paintings on display at the St. Louis Museum as well as at galleries in New York City and Japan. Fujimura has served on the National Council on the Arts. More information about Makoto Fujimura and his Nihonga painting can be found at his website.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 122

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Guests on Volume 122: N. T. Wright, on the significance of narrative awareness as a gesture towards participating in God's on-going narrative and away from cultural captivity; George Marsden, on American public intellectuals of the 1950s and their anxieties concerning national purpose; Makoto Fujimura, on modernist art, Jacques Maritain, and the Eastern pictorial tradition; David Bentley Hart, on why historic theism (and all of its metaphysical claims) explains reality better than materialism does; and Thomas Lessl, on the institutional "Copernican revolution" of the university and its attending warfare mythology as enduring perpetuators of the war between science and religion.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 102

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Guests on Volume 102: Daniel M. Bell, Jr., on recovering the view that the just war tradition is more about the shaping of character and virtue than a checklist for political leaders; Lew Daly, on how the discussion concerning faith-based initiatives raised larger issues about the identity of social groups in American society; Adam K. Webb, on whether the traditional personal and communal virtues in premodern village life must be abandoned for poverty to be alleviated; Stratford Caldecott, on how denying the reality of beauty is linked to a denial of the coherent meaning of Creation; James Matthew Wilson, on Jacques Maritain's pilgrimage to faith and his subsequent development of a rich philosophy of beauty; and Thomas Hibbs, on the similar projects of painters Georges Rouault (1871-1958) and Makoto Fujimura (b. 1960), and how they each resisted various confusions in modern art.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 97

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Guests on Volume 97: Mark Noll, on how Christian higher education is aided by a commitment to something like "Christendom," a commitment to the assumption that the Gospel has consequences for all of life and all of social experience; Stanley Fish, on how university professors should refrain from bringing their own political, philosophical, and religious commitments into the classroom; James Peters, on how Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Pascal, and many others had an understanding of the nature and purpose of reason quite different from the common modern understanding; Scott Moore, on cultivating an understanding of politics that goes beyond mere statecraft, and on the limits of the notion of "rights"; and Makoto Fujimura, on how his work as a painter is enriched by writing, why artists need to cultivate an attentiveness to many things, and how visual language expresses experience.

MARS HILL AUDIO Anthology 7

On Books and Reading

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In this Anthology, Ken Myers talks with poet and former National Endowment for the Arts chairman Dana Gioia about the decline in reading among Americans of all ages and education. Also discussing the benefits of reading and the tragedy of its decline are literary critic Sven Birkerts, painter Makoto Fujimura, columnist Maggie Jackson, pastor-theologian Eugene Peterson, preacher and media ecologist Gregory Edward Reynolds, and portrait painter Catherine Prescott. 73 minutes.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 90

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Guests on Volume 90: J. Mark Bertrand, on how the language of "worldviews" can mean something richer than it often does; Michael P. Schutt, on how the day-to-day practice of Christian lawyers can reflect a Christian view of the nature of law; Michael Ward, on how C. S. Lewis's Chronicles of Narnia were shaped by medieval cosmological beliefs about the seven planets; Dana Gioia, on the disturbing trends in the reading (non)habits of Americans; Makoto Fujimura, on reading, painting, and attending to the world; Gregory Edward Reynolds, on lessons about reading from the study of media ecology; Catherine Prescott, on why portrait painters often depict their subjects with books in their hands; and Eugene Peterson, on the place of reading in the spiritual lives of Christians.