People

P. D. James

P. D. James is an acclaimed novelist whose works include, among many others, Devices and Desires, A Taste for Death, The Black Tower, Innocent Blood, and Death in Holy Orders. Her numerous honors and awards include the Silver Dagger Award, the Macavity Award, the Diamond Dagger Award for lifetime achievement from the Crime Writers' Association, and the Order of the British Empire bestowed by the Queen in 1983. In 1991, she was awarded a life peerage as Baroness James of Holland Park. An interview with James on Death in Holy Orders appeared in the March 4, 2001, edition of The Observer. The interview is available on-line.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 100

Available for mp3 purchase
Guests on Volume 100: Jennifer Burns, on the life and legacy of Ayn Rand, "goddess of the market" and entrenched enemy of altruism; Christian Smith, on the aimless cultural world of "emerging adulthood" and on how it makes the idea of objective moral order implausible; and Dallas Willard, on why it's important to recover the conviction that religious beliefs involve real knowledge. In honor of the five score milestone, part two of the issue features a look back at the beginnings of the Journal and a few special excerpts of conversations with those early guests, including Peter Kreeft on Lewis, Huxley, and J.F.K. after death; P. D. James, on good and evil in fiction; James Davison Hunter, on culture wars; Paul McHugh, on when psychiatry loses its way; Ted Prescott, on nudity in art and advertising; Ed Knippers, on the powerful presence of the body; Martha Bayles, on pop and perverse modernism; Dominic Aquila, on Christopher Lasch; Gilbert Meilaender, on random kindness; Neil Postman, on technology and culture; and Alan Jacobs, on being maudlin in Madison County.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 54

Guests on Volume 54: Robert P. Kraynak, on Christian Faith and Modern Democracy: God and Politics in the Fallen World; Mitchell L. Stevens, on home schooling and the individuality of children; Ralph C. Wood, on the Christian achievement of detective novelist P. D. James; Mark Henrie, on the films of Whit Stillman and the overcoming of irony; Terry Lindvall, on the responses of American churches to the advent of motion pictures; Richard J. Mouw, on sin, culture, and common grace; and Marilyn Chandler McEntyre, on her book In Quiet Light: Poems on Vermeer's Women.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 3

Guests on Volume 3: Andrew Kimbrell, on the bioethical issues discussed in The Human Body Shop; Allan C. Carlson, on From Cottage to Workstation: The Family's Search for Social Harmony in the Industrial Age; Larry Woiwode, on Flannery O'Connor, John Updike, and what fiction is good for; Peter Kreeft, on the reasonableness of faith, the devilishness of deconstructionism, and The Snakebite Letters; Alan Jacobs, on The Children of Men by P. D. James; Thomas Morris, on Blaise Pascal and why people still ask the Big Questions; Jay Tolson, on how Walker Percy's search for authenticity led to his conversion; and John Hodges, on the popularity of Henryck Gorecki's Third Symphony.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 2

Guests on Volume 2: P. D. James, on why evil characters are easier to depict than good characters, and why some people like mysteries while others don't; William Kilpatrick, on Why Johnny Can't Tell Right from Wrong: Moral Illiteracy and the Case for Character Education; James Schall, on what sports and games tell us about human nature; A. N. Wilson, on how writing the biography of C. S. Lewis led him to renounce belief in Christianity; Michael Aeschliman, on why A. N. Wilson is wrong about C. S. Lewis; Russell Hittinger, on the Supreme Court's decision in Planned Parenthood vs. Casey; and Richard Crawford, on composer William Billings, one of the first important American composers of sacred music.