People

Peter J. Leithart

Dr. Peter J. Leithart is President of the Theopolis Institute for Bible, Liturgy, and Culture located in Birmingham, AL. Previously he taught Theology and Literature at New Saint Andrews College, and served as pastor of Trinity Reformed Church in Moscow. A graduate of Hillsdale College and Westminster Theological Seminary, he holds a Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge. He is the author of numerous books and articles, the latter of which have appeared in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, First Things, Modern Theology, The International Journal of Systematic Theology, the Tyndale Bulletin, Pro Ecclesia, Journal of Biblical Literature, Westminster Theological Journal, and other publications. Many of Leithart's essays and blog posts can be found on the First Things website. He currently contributes a regular blog at Patheos. He and his wife, Noel, have ten children.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 136

Guests on Volume 136: Thomas Albert Howard, on the history of commemorating the Reformation; Mark Noll, on how the Reformers would want to be remembered; Andrew Pettegree, on how Martin Luther transformed the printing industry; Peter Leithart, on the biblical basis for the unity of the Church; Norm Klassen, on the political theology implicit in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales; James Litton, on the life and work of hymnologist, Erik Routley; and Joseph O’Brien, on the neglected literary achievements of J. F. Powers.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 119

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Guests on Volume 119: Mary Eberstadt, on how the decline of formation of natural families has made Christian belief less plausible and contributed to the secularization of Europe; Allan Bevere, on why the claim by “empire criticism” that the letter to the Colossians is a veiled repudiation of Roman imperial hubris is mistaken; Peter J. Leithart, on how the Bible evaluates empires in light of their relationship with the people of God; Steven Boyer, on why “mystery” is a necessary category in Christian theology; Karen Dieleman, on how different liturgical practices of Victorian congregationalism, Anglo-Catholicism, and Roman Catholicism influenced the poetry of Elizabeth Barret Browning, Christina Rossetti, and Adelaide Proctor; and Peter Phillips, on the founding of The Tallis Scholars and the peculiar beauty of Renaissance polyphony.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 104

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Guests on Volume 104: James Le Fanu, on the mistaken assumption that modern medical science has eliminated the fittingness of a sense of mystery and wonder at the human mind and body; Garret Keizer, on how many noises in modern life reveal a state of warfare with the limitations of our embodiment; Daniel Ritchie, on how Jonathan Swift (1667-1745) and Isaac Watts (1674-1748) anticipated late twentieth-century critiques of the Enlightenment; Monica Ganas, on how the distinct vision of life embedded in "California-ism" has exerted a powerful cultural influence; Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove, on how the search for faithfulness to Christ led him to the wisdom of the Benedictine Rule and a "new monasticism"; and Peter J. Leithart, on why Constantine has an unfairly bad reputation and on how his rule dealt a severe blow to paganism in the West.

MARS HILL AUDIO Journal

Volume 92

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Guests on Volume 92: Jake Halpern, on the ecosystem of celebrity and the complicated reasons why people seek to become famous; Stephen J. Nichols, on how the dynamics of American culture have shaped our understanding of who Jesus is; Richard M. Gamble, on resources for and the outlines of a theology of education; Peter J. Leithart, on how concerns from some postmodern thinkers echo the eschatological perspective of Solomon (as presented in the book of Ecclesiastes); Bill Vitek, on how wise living on the Earth requires the humble recognition of our ignorance as well as the application of knowledge; and Craig Holdrege, on lessons from Goethe about how we understand the rest of Creation as participants, not detached and potentially omniscient observers, and also on the "conversational" quality of our engagement with Creation.